The volcanic caramel of Nishinoshima

Some volcanoes deserve attention just because they are wonderful caramels that never stop tasting good. Nishinoshima is such a candy and I should really have written quite a lot more about her. In reality though it is hard to write about her since she does not have any monitoring equipment, nor does she have ready…

Southern Japan Calderas

The 5 Sisters of Kyushu As someone who is interested in volcanology, I’ll admit that I find large eruptions and large calderas way more interesting than effusive or smaller eruptions. Regardless of size, there is a lot more intrigue with large eruptions as they’re simply more of a mystery than small eruptions. Much of the…

Sakura-jima – What type of lavas does she produce?

A quick re-cap: Sakura-jima is a post-caldera cone of the Aira caldera. She emerged roughly 13,000 years ago on the southern rim of the caldera, building an island which was eventually connected to the Osumi Peninsula during the eruption of 1914. She is located near the junction of several tectonic plates, whose movement drives eruptive…

Sakura-jima: Why is She Nearly Always Erupting?

Sakura-jima (31° 35’N, 130° 39’) is located in a tectonically lively part of the world. Her magma is generated from the movement of several tectonic plates in her vicinity: Plate Sub / Micro-plate Eurasian Plate: Amur Plate Okinawa Plate Yangste Plate Pacific Plate: Philippine Sea Plate From maps published under Wiki Commons from one by…