Hawaiian Islands from Space

A Short Geologic History of Kauai, Hawaii

Introduction Kauai is the oldest of eight major Hawaiian Islands at some 5.1 MY. It sits some 170 km to the west of Oahu. There is a much smaller island called Niihau which sits some 28 km to its west. The rest of the string of Hawaiian Ridge islands and Emperor Seamounts stretch to the…

Koko Crater, Hanauma Bay and Hawaii Kai. Image from Wikipedia (by Mbz1, CC-BY-SA-2.5).

The Volcanic Landmarks of Oahu, Hawaii – The Conclusion

Hanauma Crater The Hanauma Crater was created during the Honolulu volcano series. The volcanic vents that formed Hanauma Crater opened on the seafloor about 32,000 years ago. Upwelling magma vaporized the ocean water and steam explosions atomized the magma into fine ash. The explosions built cones of ash, which solidified into tuff. The eruptions shattered the coral…

Diamond Head. Image by ProveIt (Wikipedia, CC-BY-SA).

The Volcanic Landmarks of Oahu, Hawaii – Part 1, Diamond Head

Diamond Head is probably the most iconic landmark of Oahu.  You see it everywhere – from the beach, from your hotel room, on post cards, on travel brochures, in movies and television shows.  It is known to Hawaiians as Lēʻahi, most likely from lae’browridge promontory’ plus ʻahi ‘tuna’ because the shape of the ridgeline resembles the shape of a tuna´s dorsal…

Credit: Wikipedia

The Volcanoes of Oahu, Hawaii

When anyone mentions the volcanoes of Hawaii, most of us immediately think Kilauea and/or Mauna Loa, both located on the big island of Hawaii.  Kilauea is the youngest and best known, because it has been in constant eruption since 1983.  Mauna Loa is earth’s largest volcano and last erupted in 1984.  It is more than…