Photograph by Eggert Norðdahl. All rights reserved and used under permission.

Bárðarbunga loves Grimsvötn = True

I once again reiterate that it is Icelandic Met Office and Almannavarnadeild ríkislögreglustjóra that has the authority to issue warnings for Iceland in regards of eruptions and jökulhlaups. For airborne ash advisories it is in the following order London VAAC and IMO that issues advisories. That being said here follows a brief update upon what…

A smal part of the 1477 eruption of Veidivötn. Photograph by Rajan Parrikar.

Volcanic summer in Iceland, Part II

Bárdarbunga The Bárdarbunga volcanic system is the largest in Iceland and it has erupted more lava than any other volcano on the planet in the last 10 000 years. The volcanic system is 200 kilometers long and 25 kilometers wide. The central volcano has a seventy square kilometer caldera that is ten kilometers across. Technically it…

Truly spectacular Etna photograph by Giovanni Basso.

Waiting for Etna Part II & Riddles

While we are waiting for the expected fiery occurrence of Etnas Twentieth Paroxysm we can warm ourselves by watching expectantly the cams for Etna or go on a detour to Sakurajima. Or why not delve into the mysterious tremor encircling 20 percent of Iceland starting somewhere between Hekla and Katla reaching all the way around…

Snaefellsness, the site for Jules Vernes volcanic ruminations.

Edificating the Daily Fail and Friday’s NtV Riddle!

While we are pondering the deep magmatic earthquakes that are taking place under the Harðurátungusprungu I thought we should teach the news media that there are many volcanoes in Iceland. Some newspapers seem to only know about Katla and perhaps Lakí, and if they are really spiffy they might have heard about Hekla. A few…

trölladyngja

Icelandic earthquake oddities

During the last couple of days there have been a few small, but still noteworthy earthquakes along the Bárdarbunga fissure swarm. I thought we should bring them to light and put them slightly into context, but first a brief background. Background The Bárdarbunga fissure swarm is the longest of Iceland’s fissure swarms spanning 180 kilometers…